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    Wine pairing: 4 suggestions with cheese and charcuterie

    Learn how to choose the best parings for cheeses and charcuterie. Discover 4 suggestions for wine pairings to enjoy with pleasure.
    
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    Cheese and charcuterie. Two delicacies that few Portuguese can resist and the ideal solution to have at home, at the time of snacking with friends, family or after a long day of work. Because of their flavor and the consumption moment, these delicacies require special care when pairing with wine. This is what you should know to always get it right.

     

    Wine Pairing: what you need to know

     

    To achieve the correct wine pairing there are several aspects to consider: the intensity of the flavor, the salt content, the presence of fat and even the texture and the degree of ripeness of the food. As a general rule, hard rind cheeses go well with red wines, and fresh cheeses, with more intense flavor, are better suited to white wines.

     

    As for charcuterie, smoked meats with more presence of fat call for fresher and more acidic wines, meats with a fine cut and subtle flavor go better with more structured red wines. With these tips, it is already possible to make a good wine pairing with cheese and charcuterie. But to be a bit more specific, there are several foolproof combinations to follow.

     

    4 suggestions for pairing wine with cheese and charcuterie

     

    If you need to know the best wine pairings for your next special occasion, follow these 4 suggestions, easy to prepare and ready to serve in a few minutes.

     

    1. Gouda, Cheddar, Brie and Parmesan, pairing with red wine

     

    White to yellow cheeses, made from cow’s milk, with firm consistency and light to medium intensity of flavor, go well with rich and complex wines. Gouda, Cheddar and Brie cheeses, in particular, have a consistent texture and rind, a subtle and versatile flavor, and match wines with red fruit notes.

     

    The pairing should be done with a full-bodied red wine, with tannins and balanced acidity, silky and with a long and persistent finish, to compensate the aromas of these cheeses. For its aromatic profile, Mandriola red wine will match perfectly.

     

    2. Ricotta, Mozzarela, Feta and Roquefort, pairing with white wine

     

    Mozzarella or Ricotta cheeses are lighter, with a discreet flavor and little or no aging. They pair well with wines that have equally delicate characteristics, with fruity and refreshing notes.

     

    Feta cheese, quite common in Greek cuisine, is usually made from sheep and goat’s milk. Its flavor, particularly piquant and medium-textured, with no rind on the surface, demands lighter wines with balanced acidity.

     

    For lovers of intense blue cheeses, having a Roquefort on the table is an excellent idea. Combine this delicacy, with intense and striking flavor, and softer and slightly brittle texture, with a wine of more fruity and tropical notes.

     

    These cheeses ask for a glass of wine that reminds of summer, light and balanced white wines like Mandriola white wine.

     

    3. Smoked ham and Paio (Portuguese Charcuterie), pairing with red wine

     

    In a country with a wide production of quality cured sausages, it is not always easy to know which are the best choices for pairing with wine. Meats with an excellent degree of maturation, meticulously controlled and monitored, make delicious smoked sausages, with a fine and delicate cut. A good sign is the presence of fat fully integrated into the meat and able to melt in the mouth.

     

    Excellent examples are Iberian, Serrano or Parma smoked ham, and Paios – smoked pork loin sausage, prepared with garlic, sweet bell pepper and white wine, with a noble texture and flavor that call for a worthy partner. Mandriola red wine is the perfect choice – the structure and aromatic richness of this wine counterbalance the salty and light flavor of these delicacies.

     

    4. Farinheira, Morcela and Salami with white wines

     

    Farinheira, Morcela and Salames, with higher fat content, suggest pairing with a wine of higher acidity, freshness and lightness.

     

    Farinheira, a Portuguese smoked sausage, usually served as a snack or as part of some Portuguese traditional dishes such as Cozido à Portuguesa (literally translated: “Boil a la Portuguese”) or Feijoada à Moda do Porto (a hearty bean stew with beef and pork), is made from wheat flour, pork fat and seasonings (white wine, paprika, salt and pepper). The flavor, full of spicy aromas, demands an easy and seductive wine like Mandriola white.

     

    For its fresh and fruity profile, this wine also pairs well with Morcela, a Portuguese black pudding sausage also known as blood pudding, rich in and with a sweeter flavor. More distinct and fatty sausages such as Salami, also match perfectly with this elegant white wine.

     

    Mandriola de Lisboa, the perfect pair(ing)

     

    Now that you know how to perfectly combine some of the most appreciated delicacies at the Portuguese table, start planning an afternoon of snacks between friends and family. Enjoy a long day between good food, good conversations, and toasts with the most relaxed wine of all: Mandriola de Lisboa.

    [seccao_slider] => Array ( [slideshow] => ) [article_text_2] => [showmap] => Não )

    Cheese and charcuterie. Two delicacies that few Portuguese can resist and the ideal solution to have at home, at the time of snacking with friends, family or after a long day of work. Because of their flavor and the consumption moment, these delicacies require special care when pairing with wine. This is what you should know to always get it right.

     

    Wine Pairing: what you need to know

     

    To achieve the correct wine pairing there are several aspects to consider: the intensity of the flavor, the salt content, the presence of fat and even the texture and the degree of ripeness of the food. As a general rule, hard rind cheeses go well with red wines, and fresh cheeses, with more intense flavor, are better suited to white wines.

     

    As for charcuterie, smoked meats with more presence of fat call for fresher and more acidic wines, meats with a fine cut and subtle flavor go better with more structured red wines. With these tips, it is already possible to make a good wine pairing with cheese and charcuterie. But to be a bit more specific, there are several foolproof combinations to follow.

     

    4 suggestions for pairing wine with cheese and charcuterie

     

    If you need to know the best wine pairings for your next special occasion, follow these 4 suggestions, easy to prepare and ready to serve in a few minutes.

     

    1. Gouda, Cheddar, Brie and Parmesan, pairing with red wine

     

    White to yellow cheeses, made from cow’s milk, with firm consistency and light to medium intensity of flavor, go well with rich and complex wines. Gouda, Cheddar and Brie cheeses, in particular, have a consistent texture and rind, a subtle and versatile flavor, and match wines with red fruit notes.

     

    The pairing should be done with a full-bodied red wine, with tannins and balanced acidity, silky and with a long and persistent finish, to compensate the aromas of these cheeses. For its aromatic profile, Mandriola red wine will match perfectly.

     

    2. Ricotta, Mozzarela, Feta and Roquefort, pairing with white wine

     

    Mozzarella or Ricotta cheeses are lighter, with a discreet flavor and little or no aging. They pair well with wines that have equally delicate characteristics, with fruity and refreshing notes.

     

    Feta cheese, quite common in Greek cuisine, is usually made from sheep and goat’s milk. Its flavor, particularly piquant and medium-textured, with no rind on the surface, demands lighter wines with balanced acidity.

     

    For lovers of intense blue cheeses, having a Roquefort on the table is an excellent idea. Combine this delicacy, with intense and striking flavor, and softer and slightly brittle texture, with a wine of more fruity and tropical notes.

     

    These cheeses ask for a glass of wine that reminds of summer, light and balanced white wines like Mandriola white wine.

     

    3. Smoked ham and Paio (Portuguese Charcuterie), pairing with red wine

     

    In a country with a wide production of quality cured sausages, it is not always easy to know which are the best choices for pairing with wine. Meats with an excellent degree of maturation, meticulously controlled and monitored, make delicious smoked sausages, with a fine and delicate cut. A good sign is the presence of fat fully integrated into the meat and able to melt in the mouth.

     

    Excellent examples are Iberian, Serrano or Parma smoked ham, and Paios – smoked pork loin sausage, prepared with garlic, sweet bell pepper and white wine, with a noble texture and flavor that call for a worthy partner. Mandriola red wine is the perfect choice – the structure and aromatic richness of this wine counterbalance the salty and light flavor of these delicacies.

     

    4. Farinheira, Morcela and Salami with white wines

     

    Farinheira, Morcela and Salames, with higher fat content, suggest pairing with a wine of higher acidity, freshness and lightness.

     

    Farinheira, a Portuguese smoked sausage, usually served as a snack or as part of some Portuguese traditional dishes such as Cozido à Portuguesa (literally translated: “Boil a la Portuguese”) or Feijoada à Moda do Porto (a hearty bean stew with beef and pork), is made from wheat flour, pork fat and seasonings (white wine, paprika, salt and pepper). The flavor, full of spicy aromas, demands an easy and seductive wine like Mandriola white.

     

    For its fresh and fruity profile, this wine also pairs well with Morcela, a Portuguese black pudding sausage also known as blood pudding, rich in and with a sweeter flavor. More distinct and fatty sausages such as Salami, also match perfectly with this elegant white wine.

     

    Mandriola de Lisboa, the perfect pair(ing)

     

    Now that you know how to perfectly combine some of the most appreciated delicacies at the Portuguese table, start planning an afternoon of snacks between friends and family. Enjoy a long day between good food, good conversations, and toasts with the most relaxed wine of all: Mandriola de Lisboa.

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