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    7 fatores que fazem toda a diferença no sabor do vinho

    Wine taste: 7 aspects that make all the difference

    Why does a wine become fresher, fruitier or more complex? Discover 7 aspects that affect the taste of a wine.
    
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    The personality of each wine is the result of a unique combination of ingredients. From the climate to the grape variety, winemaking and ageing, there are many stages, contributions and techniques that will decide the final experience. We reveal the main aspects that make all the difference when you make a toast.

     

    1. Climate: freshness and aromas

     

    The climate of the region where the grapes are grown has a very important impact on the development of the grapes and, consequently, on the profile of the wine. In regions with warmer, sunnier climates, the grapes are exposed to prolonged and intense sunlight, which results in ripe grapes rich in natural sugars. The heat also accelerates the production of aromatic compounds, which translates into richer, more intense wines.

     

    On the other hand, in cooler climates the grapes ripen in a slower and more controlled way, which preserves the acidity. The result is more elegant and fresher wines, with a delicate balance between sweetness and acidity.

     

    2. Soil: vine nutrition and the texture of wine

     

    Did you know that different soils result in different aromas? The composition of the soil influences the nutrients available to the vines and therefore influences the growth of the grapes.

     

    For example, vines planted in limestone soils absorb specific minerals, such as calcium and magnesium, which translates into sharp flavors that remind you of these elements. On the other hand, clay soils retain more water, resulting in a more balanced maturation and wines with a richer texture. Another example are sandy soils, which facilitate the growth of the vines’ roots, but have little water retention capacity, which can create grapes with softer flavors, and wines with interesting mineral touches.

     

    3. Topography: how the sun and water affect taste

     

    Have you ever wondered how wines from the same region – with the same soil, grape varieties and climate – can taste so different? In the production of a wine, everything counts. The slope of the land and the orientation of the vines in relation to the sun influence the temperature distribution and, consequently, the ripening of the grapes, which explains the diversity in wines from the same region.

     

    In mountainous regions or on steep slopes, the topography creates variable exposure to sunlight. The result is grapes with varying levels of sweetness, acidity and ripeness. This variation translates into a greater complexity of flavors in the final wines. In addition, topography also influences soil drainage. Vineyards on steeper terrain generally accumulate less water on the surface, which can result in greater concentration of the grapes and their compounds. On the other hand, flatter terrain tends to retain more water, which makes the vine cycle more stable and can lead to more balanced wines.

     

    4. Grape varieties: different aromatic profiles

     

    Different grape varieties (or species) have unique aromatic profiles and flavors. The choice of grape variety is essential in determining the nature of the flavors and also the acidity of the wines. For example, Touriga Nacional, a widely recognized grape variety in Portugal, produces full-bodied wines with intense notes of red fruits and flowers such as violets. On the other hand, the Touriga Franca variety is famous for producing wines with softer red fruit and firm tannins. When combined, they result in unique creations of structure and aromatic richness.

     

    In addition to these varieties, there are several other more local and indigenous varieties that add diversity to the flavors of the wine. Tempranillo in Spain, Malbec in Argentina and Pinotage in South Africa are just a few examples of grape varieties that produce unique and characteristic wines.

     

    5. Fermentation: the turning point

     

    Fermentation is the chemical process in which yeasts consume the sugars present in the must, transforming them into alcohol and carbon dioxide. This process transforms the must into wine, creating unique flavors. Yeasts can be spontaneous or selected. Selected yeasts allow greater control over the final result.

     

    In addition, the by-products of fermentation, such as aldehydes and acids, add to the aromatic complexity. The fermentation temperature itself influences the final result. Lower temperatures bring out fresher, fruitier aromas, while higher temperatures can lead to more intense, bolder aromas. Fermentation time must also be taken into account. Slower, more controlled fermentations can result in more complex and balanced wines, while faster fermentations tend to produce younger, more vibrant wines.

     

    6. Ageing: the crucial phase

     

    The ageing period of the wine can soften the tannins, intensify the flavors and add more complex aromatic nuances. Time is an essential ally in the formation of flavors associated with top quality wines. As the wines rest, they undergo a gradual process of transformation, the result of interaction with the wood in the barrel. They evolve and age, transforming their constituents and absorbing others. The result of aging in young oak barrels, for example, is the incorporation of notes of vanilla, spices and even subtle nuances of tobacco.

     

    The ageing time can vary from a few months to several years, depending on the type of wine desired and the winemaker’s vision. Wines with a short ageing period preserve their fresh and fruity characteristics, while the great wines of Bordeaux, for example, or Ports, can age for decades, revealing layers of complexity as time goes by.

     

    7. Winemaker’s mastery: the personal signature

     

    The winemaker’s experience and mastery are fundamental in making decisions throughout the production process to enhance the desired characteristics of the wine. Choosing the time of harvest is one of the first decisions to be made, as it directly affects the levels of sugar, acidity and concentration of flavors in the grapes and subsequently in the wine. Monitoring the fermentation process and the conditions in which it takes place are also entirely his responsibility.

     

    The selection of the type of tank or barrel and the ageing time is also in the hands of the winemaker. At the end of the day, the talented art of combining different blends is also in his hands, where he will be able to design and build the final profile of the wine, ensuring that the final blend has the degree of complexity and characteristics he wants.

     

    The winemaker’s mastery is especially tested in more challenging years. A rainy or very hot harvest can produce grapes with different characteristics than usual. In these cases, creative decisions have to be made to adjust the process and thus produce a balanced and tasty wine. Like a signature on a masterpiece.

     

    Mandriola, a taste of life’s best moments

     

    These are the aspects that transform the taste of wine. Each one has enormous importance in creating a wide diversity of flavors, making the tasting experience truly unique and fascinating.

     

    Mandriola wine is made from Syrah, Alicante Bouschet and Touriga Nacional grape varieties from clay-limestone soils. It is then aged in wood for 6 months. The result? A wine with spicy notes and red fruit that reveals a balanced acidity and elegant tannins. Perfect for enjoying the moment and exploring new experiences without rushing. Open a bottle of Mandriola and toast to the best that life has to offer!

    [seccao_slider] => Array ( [slideshow] => ) [article_text_2] => [showmap] => Não )

    The personality of each wine is the result of a unique combination of ingredients. From the climate to the grape variety, winemaking and ageing, there are many stages, contributions and techniques that will decide the final experience. We reveal the main aspects that make all the difference when you make a toast.

     

    1. Climate: freshness and aromas

     

    The climate of the region where the grapes are grown has a very important impact on the development of the grapes and, consequently, on the profile of the wine. In regions with warmer, sunnier climates, the grapes are exposed to prolonged and intense sunlight, which results in ripe grapes rich in natural sugars. The heat also accelerates the production of aromatic compounds, which translates into richer, more intense wines.

     

    On the other hand, in cooler climates the grapes ripen in a slower and more controlled way, which preserves the acidity. The result is more elegant and fresher wines, with a delicate balance between sweetness and acidity.

     

    2. Soil: vine nutrition and the texture of wine

     

    Did you know that different soils result in different aromas? The composition of the soil influences the nutrients available to the vines and therefore influences the growth of the grapes.

     

    For example, vines planted in limestone soils absorb specific minerals, such as calcium and magnesium, which translates into sharp flavors that remind you of these elements. On the other hand, clay soils retain more water, resulting in a more balanced maturation and wines with a richer texture. Another example are sandy soils, which facilitate the growth of the vines’ roots, but have little water retention capacity, which can create grapes with softer flavors, and wines with interesting mineral touches.

     

    3. Topography: how the sun and water affect taste

     

    Have you ever wondered how wines from the same region – with the same soil, grape varieties and climate – can taste so different? In the production of a wine, everything counts. The slope of the land and the orientation of the vines in relation to the sun influence the temperature distribution and, consequently, the ripening of the grapes, which explains the diversity in wines from the same region.

     

    In mountainous regions or on steep slopes, the topography creates variable exposure to sunlight. The result is grapes with varying levels of sweetness, acidity and ripeness. This variation translates into a greater complexity of flavors in the final wines. In addition, topography also influences soil drainage. Vineyards on steeper terrain generally accumulate less water on the surface, which can result in greater concentration of the grapes and their compounds. On the other hand, flatter terrain tends to retain more water, which makes the vine cycle more stable and can lead to more balanced wines.

     

    4. Grape varieties: different aromatic profiles

     

    Different grape varieties (or species) have unique aromatic profiles and flavors. The choice of grape variety is essential in determining the nature of the flavors and also the acidity of the wines. For example, Touriga Nacional, a widely recognized grape variety in Portugal, produces full-bodied wines with intense notes of red fruits and flowers such as violets. On the other hand, the Touriga Franca variety is famous for producing wines with softer red fruit and firm tannins. When combined, they result in unique creations of structure and aromatic richness.

     

    In addition to these varieties, there are several other more local and indigenous varieties that add diversity to the flavors of the wine. Tempranillo in Spain, Malbec in Argentina and Pinotage in South Africa are just a few examples of grape varieties that produce unique and characteristic wines.

     

    5. Fermentation: the turning point

     

    Fermentation is the chemical process in which yeasts consume the sugars present in the must, transforming them into alcohol and carbon dioxide. This process transforms the must into wine, creating unique flavors. Yeasts can be spontaneous or selected. Selected yeasts allow greater control over the final result.

     

    In addition, the by-products of fermentation, such as aldehydes and acids, add to the aromatic complexity. The fermentation temperature itself influences the final result. Lower temperatures bring out fresher, fruitier aromas, while higher temperatures can lead to more intense, bolder aromas. Fermentation time must also be taken into account. Slower, more controlled fermentations can result in more complex and balanced wines, while faster fermentations tend to produce younger, more vibrant wines.

     

    6. Ageing: the crucial phase

     

    The ageing period of the wine can soften the tannins, intensify the flavors and add more complex aromatic nuances. Time is an essential ally in the formation of flavors associated with top quality wines. As the wines rest, they undergo a gradual process of transformation, the result of interaction with the wood in the barrel. They evolve and age, transforming their constituents and absorbing others. The result of aging in young oak barrels, for example, is the incorporation of notes of vanilla, spices and even subtle nuances of tobacco.

     

    The ageing time can vary from a few months to several years, depending on the type of wine desired and the winemaker’s vision. Wines with a short ageing period preserve their fresh and fruity characteristics, while the great wines of Bordeaux, for example, or Ports, can age for decades, revealing layers of complexity as time goes by.

     

    7. Winemaker’s mastery: the personal signature

     

    The winemaker’s experience and mastery are fundamental in making decisions throughout the production process to enhance the desired characteristics of the wine. Choosing the time of harvest is one of the first decisions to be made, as it directly affects the levels of sugar, acidity and concentration of flavors in the grapes and subsequently in the wine. Monitoring the fermentation process and the conditions in which it takes place are also entirely his responsibility.

     

    The selection of the type of tank or barrel and the ageing time is also in the hands of the winemaker. At the end of the day, the talented art of combining different blends is also in his hands, where he will be able to design and build the final profile of the wine, ensuring that the final blend has the degree of complexity and characteristics he wants.

     

    The winemaker’s mastery is especially tested in more challenging years. A rainy or very hot harvest can produce grapes with different characteristics than usual. In these cases, creative decisions have to be made to adjust the process and thus produce a balanced and tasty wine. Like a signature on a masterpiece.

     

    Mandriola, a taste of life’s best moments

     

    These are the aspects that transform the taste of wine. Each one has enormous importance in creating a wide diversity of flavors, making the tasting experience truly unique and fascinating.

     

    Mandriola wine is made from Syrah, Alicante Bouschet and Touriga Nacional grape varieties from clay-limestone soils. It is then aged in wood for 6 months. The result? A wine with spicy notes and red fruit that reveals a balanced acidity and elegant tannins. Perfect for enjoying the moment and exploring new experiences without rushing. Open a bottle of Mandriola and toast to the best that life has to offer!

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